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JAMES FAJARDO
JAMES FAJARDO
1 year ago

I’ve always wondered how they got the shades to fall that way and in those places. Thanks for the explanation. Is there a calligrapher out there doing roundhand with this cut nib or getting the same classic look with a pointed pen retouched meticulously?

JAMES FAJARDO
JAMES FAJARDO
Reply to  Sybille van Zuylen
1 year ago

Thanks for replying. We need to bring this back! It’s just not the same with modern nibs 😐

JAMES FAJARDO
JAMES FAJARDO
Reply to  Sybille van Zuylen
1 year ago

I’m too lazy haha. Surely we have the technology now to manufacture long-lasting “quills”. Problem is there’s no market for this kind of stuff 😭

So are the shades produced by pressure as well or manipulation? Don’t say ‘both’ coz that would be too hard to execute & I’d like to keep thinking this is doable 😂

JAMES FAJARDO
JAMES FAJARDO
Reply to  Sybille van Zuylen
1 year ago

That’s what I thought too. It’s got to be a combination. Which makes writing like that even harder. Almost seems like they alter the hand position mid writing in some areas to achieve certain shades. If only they had video recordings 😅

AAAndrew
AAAndrew
1 year ago

Even back in the day of quills, very few people were skilled at cutting and mending them. As steel pens became more common, one constant refrain in their favor was how much everyone hated mending pens, and how practically no one was really skilled at it. And people went through a lot of them. I have a document that discusses the use of quills, patent and steel pens by the Bank of England in the 19th-century. The BoE kept meticulous records of supplies ordered and used (as you would expect of bankers), so there are tons of statistics. They mark… Read more »

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